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When Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar in May 2008, many families lost their homes and means of making a living. Our emergency response included providing shelter to some of those most in need. Pyone Pyone and her daughter received materials to build a new home. 'When I found my name on the list to get a house I was happy… Now I feel more secure. When it rains, this will protect us.' (Photo: Jane Beesley/ Oxfam Great Britain)

  • Population: 56.3 million (July 2015 est.)
  • Human Development Index: 148 (among 188 countries)
  • GDP per capita: US$4,800 (2014 est.)
  • Population below poverty line: 25.6% (2010 est.)

Sources: CIA – The World Factbook (as of 7 January, 2016), Asian Development Bank – Basic Statistics 2015

 

Oxfam in Myanmar

Oxfam has been supporting communities in Myanmar since 2008 when the devastating impact of Cyclone Nargis hit the Delta region. Oxfam’s vision for Myanmar is for women, ethnic nationalities, and all citizens to be able to enjoy their social, cultural, economic, civil and political rights. In 2013-14, Oxfam's work benefited 100,000 people in Myanmar.

 

Our work's focus

Oxfam supports its partners to build the capacity of Forest User Groups. [Team introduced the existing problems in the community forest management of Myanmar.]

Community empowerment

  • Amplify community voices to fight for their own rights, increase their influence in shaping local policies and decisions related to resource allocation, and promote an accountable civil society which is able to drive pro-poor policies and equitable change.

 

 

Tobias Jackson, former Associate Country Director, Oxfam Hong Kong, attended the Symposium on National Agricultural Development Pro-Poor Policies, to promote pro-poor land reform in Myanmar.

Engaging the local government

  • Encourage responsiveness within the local government so as to respond to the priorities of its people, and engage community networks and civil society in order to work with a wide range of national and international actors.

(Tobias Jackson, former Associate Country Director, Oxfam Hong Kong, attended the Symposium on National Agricultural Development Pro-Poor Policies, to promote pro-poor land reform in Myanmar.)

Participation of women

  • Help women in society to gain positions of leadership and participate in decision-making processes at all levels.

(Women preparing plastic bags for transplanting teak and iron timber tree seedlings in In Gan village, Kachin State.)

Participation of women

  • Help women in society to gain positions of leadership and participate in decision-making processes at all levels.

 

Impact of our work

'Unlike other projects we have seen, this project is to help us understand our rights so we can change practices for good.'(Photo: Oxfam in Myanmar)

U Aung Win lives in Gway Chaung, which is a small village of 570 people along the Daedaye river. Most of the villagers have long been deprived of fishing rights as powerful business interests prevented them from competing in the tender process. U Aung Win and other villagers have taken part in Network Activities Group supported by Oxfam. They received training in fishery law, accounting, and new techniques for fishing and agriculture, which improved their livelihoods security and amplified the community's voice. They also set up the Fishers Development Committees (FDC) to manage grants and started a group loan system. U Aung Win became a FDC member to help others with health or educational issues.

(Photo: Oxfam in Myanmar)