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[update on 23 December, 2016]


Act Now!

Hong Kong Donor: Donate Online
Macau Donor: Donate Online


Over the past six years, with no end in sight to the conflict in Syria, hundreds of thousands of people are living in desperate conditions and exposed to continuing violence. Today, half the pre-conflict population of 22 million Syrians have fled their homes and more than 13.5 million people urgently need your help. In December, 35,000 people were evacuated from the northern city of Aleppo according to the UN. 

The human suffering caused by the six years of civil war in Syria is overwhelming. We are helping those affected by the crisis, across Syria, Lebanon and Jordan and in Greece, Serbia and Macedonia.

The Scale of the Syrian Crisis

Since the crisis started in March 2011, more than 300,000 lives have been lost in Syria. Today, the situation in the country continues to go from bad to worse with over 13.5 million people affected by the conflict and in need of humanitarian aid, including 6.1 million people internally displaced from their homes. 

More than 4.8 million people have fled to neighbouring countries including Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey. Three-quarters of them are women and children. The steady arrival of families displaced by the conflict in those countries is putting extreme pressure on local infrastructure and economies. In Lebanon alone, one in every five people is now a refugee from Syria. Turkey currently hosts more than 2.7 million Syrians, as well as a quarter of a million refugees of other nationalities – more than any other country in the world. 

Additionally, the majority of Syrian families sheltering in neighbouring countries live in urban areas, outside of formal camp settings. This makes it harder for them to access vital help. More than 70 per cent of refugees in Lebanon and 87 per cent in Jordan live below the national poverty line. 

Oxfam Hong Kong allocated HK$2.76 million to respond to this emergency. We urgently need your help to do more.

Oxfam’s Response in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria

In Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon, we are helping more than 2 million people with life-saving clean water, sanitation, and vital support for families who have lost everything.

In Neighbouring Countries

In Jordan and Lebanon, we are supporting refugees with clean drinking water or cash with establishing the operation centres since 2013. We are helping families get the information they need about their legal and human rights and connecting them to medical, legal and support services. 

We have built shower and toilet blocks in refugee camps, informal settlements along routes used by people fleeing Syria and have installed or repaired toilets in communities hosting refugees. Piped water schemes are being developed for Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp and in host communities in the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon.

Inside Syria

Inside Syria, we are focusing on rehabilitating the water infrastructure, including repairing wells. We are planning to provide clean water to 1.5 million people and working on public health promotion, solid waste management and supporting livelihoods. 

In mid-December, Oxfam started moving the relief stock from Damascus to Aleppo. These include:
- a total of 20L Jerry Cans and 14L buckets with taps for 6,000 households
- 10m³ PVC water tanks and 45m³ water tanks for the affected community 

More relief items, such as 10,200 family hygiene kits, latrines, winter clothing, baby diapers, blankets, mattresses and sanitary pads will be dispatched next.

Campaigning for a Political Solution to the Conflict

Providing life-saving support to the millions of people affected by this devastating conflict is essential but it is not enough. We have been campaigning and advocating for an end to the fighting, and a sustainable and inclusive political solution since the beginning of the crisis. 

We will continue to call on all parties to the conflict to stop any arms transfers and guarantee humanitarian access and protection of civilians, whether inside Syria or in neighbouring countries. 

We are also calling for rich states to commit to fully funding this year’s Syria crisis response appeal and to resettle 10 per cent of all registered Syrian refugees by the end of 2017.

The full fair share analysis for funding and resettlement pledges received to date are available here.

The paper ‘Where there’s a will, there’s a way – Safe havens needed for refugees from Syria’ released in December is available here.

Oxfam is providing water filters to the refugee families in the Jordan Valley so safe drinking water is available. F. Muath/Oxfam
Informal tented settlements are common at the Zaatari Refugee Camp. F. Muath/Oxfam
Collecting water from a tap stand in Zaatari camp. Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Oxfam water tanks at Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan. Anastasia Taylor-Lind
After having gathered at a Jordanian army processing centre on the Syria/Jordan border, Syrian refugees are transported to Zaatari Refugee Camp. Anastasia Taylor-Lind.
In Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan, people collect water that has just been delivered by truck. Lucy Brinicombe/Oxfam
A young boy sits amongst the rubble of his home. A Syrian teenager looking on as other people of Tariq al-Bab neighborhood walk in the rubble left by a missile attack which hit the area one day earlier, in Aleppo, Syria, 23 February 2013. EPA/ BRUNO GALLARDO
A Syrian man surveys the damage to his home. A Syrian man (R), resident of the Jabal Badero neighbourhood whose house was destroyed, reacts as others inspect the damages, after an alleged missile strike two days earlier, Aleppo, Syria,20 February 2013. Six children were among those killed. EPA/BRUNO GALLARDO
A Syrian man walks amid debris of a destroyed building at the Jabal Badero neighbourhood, Aleppo, Syria, 20 February 2013. Six children were among those killed. EPA/BRUNO GALLARDO.
Ahmad Shadi Abdulla recieved 3 blankets during a distribution organised by Oxam Novib partner 'Najdeh'. He has just arrived with his family from Yarmouk in Syria. In Yarmouk Ahmad made a living by selling goods (food etc)from a stall outside his house. “I used to work selling things from my small stall, but we lost everything. We had to eat the stock we were supposed to sell and we gave a lot of food away to help other families. “The most important problem we are facing is how can we solve the war and end this terrible conflict? I expect we will lose everything; our house, our belongings; everything we had. Ahmad has 2 wives and 5 children with him 3 girls 2 boys. Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Ahmad Shadi Abdulla signing for 3 blankets during a distribution organised by Oxam Novib partner 'Najdeh'. He has just arrived with his family from Yarmouk in Syria. In Yarmouk Ahmad made a living by selling goods (food etc)from a stall outside his house. “I used to work selling things from my small stall, but we lost everything. We had to eat the stock we were supposed to sell and we gave a lot of food away to help other families. “The most important problem we are facing is how can we solve the war and end this terrible conflict? I expect we will lose everything; our house, our belongings; everything we had. Ahmad has 2 wives and 5 children with him 3 girls 2 boys. Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Yasmin Milhim arrived in Lebanon from Syria on the 2nd of December. She and her family ( husband and 3 children), have come from Handarat camp in Aleppo. She volunteers with Najdeh, but is also a beneficiary.“We came here because of the fighting. Right next to where we lived, many homes were completely destroyed. We thought we would die and decided to leave. We came by car, it took the whole day.... “We rent a garage space here; it costs us 150,000 Lebanese pounds each month ($100 US) There is a toilet, a small kitchen and one living room. When we left Syria, we just had the clothes we were wearing and some blankets. My husband is trying to find some work and some days he can get work, but not every day and we have to get by on just a little money. I don’t know for how much longer we’ll be able to pay for our rent; it all depends on whether my husband can find work. If we cannot pay, we will have to go back to Syria.“We don’t have any relatives here; our family are in Syria." Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Disused building serving as home to many refugees: This dilapidated apartment building is home to many Syrian refugee families, some of whom have received a money transfer control number which will allow them to collect $150 cash from a nearby Western Union branch as part of an Oxfam scheme to distribute cash to Syrian refugees to help with rent payments, in northern Lebanon on Friday May 3 2013. One family Oxfam spoke with was paying $250 a month for an extremely small, basic and rundown apartment of some 20-25 square meters. Sam Tarling/ Oxfam
Maysa Abdel Razaq Al Akhras and her son Mahmoud (9 months),and her daughters Nawal (7,L) and Amira,(4,c) sit in the cramped dilapidated apartment in which they live. The family pay $250 a month for this ~15m2 room in which they live and sleep on the mattresses piled up in the background. Their apartment also includes a cupboard-sized kitchen and bathroom and a small balcony. Maysa had just received a money transfer control number which will allow her to collect $150 cash from a nearby Western Union branch as part of an Oxfam scheme to distribute cash to Syrian refugees to help with rent payments,in northern Lebanon on Friday May 3 2013. Sam Tarling/ Oxfam