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[Updated on 9 August, 2018]

Years of brutal fighting have devastated Syria, a country that was a thriving, middle-income country before the start of the conflict in 2011.

More than 300,000 people have been killed, 13.5 million people are in need of assistance and 5 million refugees have fled Syria.

In Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon, we are helping more than 2 million people with life-saving clean water, sanitation, and vital support for families who have lost everything. But the scale of this emergency is huge and we still urgently need your help.

The situation

  • According to the UN, more than 300,000 people have been killed since the crisis began in March 2011, with the likely total far higher.
  • Half of Syria's population of 22 million have been forced to flee their homes.
  • 13.5 million people inside Syria are in need of humanitarian assistance, of which 6.3 million have had to leave their homes.
  • 5 million people have fled the country, with the majority seeking refuge in neighbouring countries such as Lebanon, where a quarter of the population are now Syrian refugees.
  • 86% of refugees live outside camps in Jordan and 70% of refugees in Lebanon live below the poverty line.
  • Syrian refugees account for the majority of the more than one million people who've fled to Europe since the start of 2015.
  • Oxfam Hong Kong allocated HK$2.76 million to respond to this emergency.  

We urgently need your help to do more.

 

Oxfam's response 

Oxfam's response in Lebanon

The impact of the wider Syria crisis in Lebanon has been massive - a 30% population increase means every area of life is under pressure, with schools, hospitals, housing and businesses all struggling to cope. We work both directly with refugees themselves, and with communities hosting refugees to address common challenges such as water and jobs. We are helping families get the information they need about their legal and human rights and connecting them to medical, legal and support services.

Oxfam has reached more than 250,000 vulnerable people in Lebanon. Our response has included:

  • Providing 3,200 hygiene kits accompanied by hygiene promotion and awareness sessionsand distributing household, communal and municipal waste bins.
  • Building and repairing over 1,100 toilets, ensuring that each is shared by no more than 20 people.
  • Installing over 720 water tanks in communal areas.
  • Delivering 10 million litres of water through water trucking, providing refugees with clean water for drinking, cooking and washing.
  • Constructing or repairing 70 shared bathing facilities, and providing families with jerry cans and water storage containers. 

 

Oxfam's response in Jordan

Oxfam is working in Zaatari refugee camp, Jordan's fourth largest 'city', to address water needs among other things. We currently help nearly 25,000 camp residents, and are working with partners on constructing a water network throughout the camp that will address the needs of all 80,000 people who live there.

Oxfam currently works in three of Za'atari's 12 districts, supervising water and sanitation, refuse management and the cleaning and maintenance of water, hygiene and sanitation blocks, we also co-ordinate hygiene promotion activities. 

In Za'atari refugee camp, Oxfam has completed construction of the first phase of the water network. Managing waste water is also crucial, and a waste water network has also been completed: 489 households now have septic tanks installed and connected, with 243 private household toilets constructed for the most vulnerable households.

In host communities Oxfam is still providing humanitarian assistance to vulnerable refugees and Jordanians, and at the same time working on more long term development issues such as water governance, economic opportunities and gender equality. During the last year Oxfam has provided humanitarian assistance to 5,913 families, who have received support in terms of winterization kits that allow vulnerable families to protect themselves from the harsh winters, protection services, cash assistance, and the rehabilitation of household water and sanitation facilities.

 

Oxfam's response in Syria

Oxfam has had an office inside Syria since July 2013, responding alongside other agencies to the urgent need for clean water. An estimated 35% of water treatment plants in Syria have been damaged during the conflict and there are concerns over water contamination.

We are working primarily to make sure people have enough clean water, and are able to keep themselves clean and healthy. The Suleiman Al-Halabi water pumping station is the main water source for Aleppo city, and we are committed to keeping the generator, which we previously installed, operational. Water pumped from here reaches people across conflict lines. We are currently installing a second huge generator in Aleppo to increase the capacity of water delivered to the population of perhaps 1.5 million people.

In Hama, the equipping of the Lwebde pumping station has been completed, facilitating the supply of clean water to 133,000 conflict affected people. The security situation continues to make operations very challenging.

 

Campaigning for a political solution to the conflict

Providing life-saving support to the millions of people affected by this devastating conflict is essential but it is not enough. We have been campaigning and advocating for an end to the fighting, and a sustainable and inclusive political solution since the beginning of the crisis.

We will continue to call on all parties to the conflict to stop any arms transfers and guarantee humanitarian access and protection of civilians, whether inside Syria or in neighbouring countries.

We are also calling for rich states to commit to fully funding this year’s Syria crisis response appeal and to resettle 10 per cent of all registered Syrian refugees.

The Recycling Project Centre in Zaatari Refugee Camp. Oxfam introduced a solid waste management and recycling project in three of the camp’s 12 districts. The project, which was well-received by Zaatari residents, is being scaled up and will be introduced in all districts of the camp. Syrian refugees working in the recycling centre. They work seven hours a day for a wage of seven Jordanian Dinars. The workers are separating different materials at the centre. (Photo: Poon Wai Nang/Oxfam)
Once waste is separated at the Recycling Centre, it is put through a shredder and then gathered in big bags. The material is then picked up by Jordanian trucks that deliver them to recycling facilities outside the camp. One ton of plastic is sold for 200 Jordanian Dinars, while a ton of cardboard goes for 25 Jordanian Dinars. The Recycling Project Centre receives 1,200 Jordanian Dinars per month for all the materials in these big bags. (Photo: Poon Wai Nang/Oxfam)
A bullet grazed 11-year-old Sara’s* skull when she fled from Syria to Jordan with her family. She now lives in Zarqa, in Jordan. Sara said, ‘I want to become a doctor and run a clinic, so I can help people in need. Once, I talked to my friends at school about becoming a doctor; I think it’s a good job because doctors can help others.’ *Some names have been changed (Photo: Poon Wai Nang/Oxfam)
Collecting water from a tap stand in Zaatari camp. Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Oxfam water tanks at Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan. Anastasia Taylor-Lind
After having gathered at a Jordanian army processing centre on the Syria/Jordan border, Syrian refugees are transported to Zaatari Refugee Camp. Anastasia Taylor-Lind.
In Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan, people collect water that has just been delivered by truck. Lucy Brinicombe/Oxfam
A young boy sits amongst the rubble of his home. A Syrian teenager looking on as other people of Tariq al-Bab neighborhood walk in the rubble left by a missile attack which hit the area one day earlier, in Aleppo, Syria, 23 February 2013. EPA/ BRUNO GALLARDO
A Syrian man surveys the damage to his home. A Syrian man (R), resident of the Jabal Badero neighbourhood whose house was destroyed, reacts as others inspect the damages, after an alleged missile strike two days earlier, Aleppo, Syria,20 February 2013. Six children were among those killed. EPA/BRUNO GALLARDO
A Syrian man walks amid debris of a destroyed building at the Jabal Badero neighbourhood, Aleppo, Syria, 20 February 2013. Six children were among those killed. EPA/BRUNO GALLARDO.
Ahmad Shadi Abdulla recieved 3 blankets during a distribution organised by Oxam Novib partner 'Najdeh'. He has just arrived with his family from Yarmouk in Syria. In Yarmouk Ahmad made a living by selling goods (food etc)from a stall outside his house. “I used to work selling things from my small stall, but we lost everything. We had to eat the stock we were supposed to sell and we gave a lot of food away to help other families. “The most important problem we are facing is how can we solve the war and end this terrible conflict? I expect we will lose everything; our house, our belongings; everything we had. Ahmad has 2 wives and 5 children with him 3 girls 2 boys. Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Ahmad Shadi Abdulla signing for 3 blankets during a distribution organised by Oxam Novib partner 'Najdeh'. He has just arrived with his family from Yarmouk in Syria. In Yarmouk Ahmad made a living by selling goods (food etc)from a stall outside his house. “I used to work selling things from my small stall, but we lost everything. We had to eat the stock we were supposed to sell and we gave a lot of food away to help other families. “The most important problem we are facing is how can we solve the war and end this terrible conflict? I expect we will lose everything; our house, our belongings; everything we had. Ahmad has 2 wives and 5 children with him 3 girls 2 boys. Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Yasmin Milhim arrived in Lebanon from Syria on the 2nd of December. She and her family ( husband and 3 children), have come from Handarat camp in Aleppo. She volunteers with Najdeh, but is also a beneficiary.“We came here because of the fighting. Right next to where we lived, many homes were completely destroyed. We thought we would die and decided to leave. We came by car, it took the whole day.... “We rent a garage space here; it costs us 150,000 Lebanese pounds each month ($100 US) There is a toilet, a small kitchen and one living room. When we left Syria, we just had the clothes we were wearing and some blankets. My husband is trying to find some work and some days he can get work, but not every day and we have to get by on just a little money. I don’t know for how much longer we’ll be able to pay for our rent; it all depends on whether my husband can find work. If we cannot pay, we will have to go back to Syria.“We don’t have any relatives here; our family are in Syria." Caroline Gluck/Oxfam
Disused building serving as home to many refugees: This dilapidated apartment building is home to many Syrian refugee families, some of whom have received a money transfer control number which will allow them to collect $150 cash from a nearby Western Union branch as part of an Oxfam scheme to distribute cash to Syrian refugees to help with rent payments, in northern Lebanon on Friday May 3 2013. One family Oxfam spoke with was paying $250 a month for an extremely small, basic and rundown apartment of some 20-25 square meters. Sam Tarling/ Oxfam
Maysa Abdel Razaq Al Akhras and her son Mahmoud (9 months),and her daughters Nawal (7,L) and Amira,(4,c) sit in the cramped dilapidated apartment in which they live. The family pay $250 a month for this ~15m2 room in which they live and sleep on the mattresses piled up in the background. Their apartment also includes a cupboard-sized kitchen and bathroom and a small balcony. Maysa had just received a money transfer control number which will allow her to collect $150 cash from a nearby Western Union branch as part of an Oxfam scheme to distribute cash to Syrian refugees to help with rent payments,in northern Lebanon on Friday May 3 2013. Sam Tarling/ Oxfam
Oxfam is providing water filters to the refugee families in the Jordan Valley so safe drinking water is available. F. Muath/Oxfam