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Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Oxfam supported its long-term partner Green Watershed in Boduoluo Village in Lijiang, Yunnan, to implement programmes on sustainable resource development and water access management so that the livelihoods of the villagers – who lack natural resources – can be improved. The programme includes providing support for the village to set up women’s groups, and offer handicraft workshops. Green Watershed was awarded the UNDP’s Equator Prize 2015 for their outstanding work on the watershed integrated management programme. Photo: Poon Wai-nang/Oxfam Volunteer Photographer

China is the first country that met the UN target of halving the number of people living in extreme poverty, but the social factors that leave people at risk of falling into or back into poverty are showing a diverse and complex trend. As such, policy research serves a very important role in pooling resources together to implement an effective poverty reduction policy. Oxfam puts much emphasis on empirical research, action research and policy advocacy, and commits to promoting the alleviation and elimination of poverty problems at the institutional level. We are mainly concerned about the following three areas: empirical research on significant national poverty reduction policies, policy feedback based on action research, and the sharing of case studies and experience nationally and internationally.

Millet Candy: Winning On All Fronts

Millet Candy: Winning On All Fronts
Photo: Oxfam

The Oxfam Shop in Central saw the launch of a special product that’s come all the way from Shaanxi during Chinese New Year in 2018: millet candy. This candy is the fruit of the labour of farmers who are a part of the livelihoods project we and our partner Xi’an Farmers’ Market are implementing in the province.

In early 2018, I went to Shaanxi Province with actor, chef and hobby farmer Joey Leung (pictured to the right) to see how millet candy is made. On our way from Xi’an to the mountainous region of Fuping County, which is known for its millet candy, we got caught in the worst blizzard in eight years; all we could see around us was snow. Extreme weather is just one of the challenges small farmers in Shaanxi face – living in remote areas with little access to markets has also become an obstacle to residents here.

In Shaanxi Province, there are 50 counties that are recognised by the state as impoverished – including Fuping and Suide Counties – and they’re all located on the Loess Plateau. Suide County produces millet, but since farmers in the area have been using chemical fertilisers and pesticides for many years, the environment has continued to deteriorate; despite growing more crops through this method, this has created a race to bottom. As a result, farming has become an unviable livelihood option and many have moved to the cities to find jobs, so villages are now dying out.

Since 2016, smallholder farmers have received support to grow different crops like millet and soybean in rural Shaanxi through Xi’an Farmers’ Market’s project. In Majiachuan Village, Suide County, participants of the project are encouraged to cultivate crops in an eco-friendly way through the training they receive; we’ve also set up an online platform and linked farmers to farmers’ markets so they can sell their crops more effectively. Now, farmers don’t use chemical fertilisers, pesticides or herbicides anymore. This has not only put a stop to environmental degradation, but has also provided villagers and future generations with safer food.

Our partner organisation has also enlisted the help of Master Sun, who we met; he’s been making millet candy for over 30 years. After a 40-hour process, he was able to handmake millet candy using Majiachuan Village’s millet. Millet candy has not only boosted millet sales, but has also helped more people learn about the quality ingredients used to make the candy as well as this traditional craft.

The success of this project has encouraged villagers in Majiachuan Village to continue this way of farming and more farmers to join the project. They now also grow crops like mung beans, red beans and black beans; some have even begun raising chickens, and replacing the fertiliser they use with chicken manure, thus creating an ecofriendly way of growing crops and raising livestock. Steps like these aren’t only improving and protecting the environment, but also enhancing the quality of villagers’ food and even their livelihoods.

Text: Mabel Wong / Fundraising Manager - Appeals (Individuals Acquisition)

 

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy

Agriculture and Poverty Reduction Policy